Sophia Maria

humansofnewyork:

"I’m always sad.""Are there certain thoughts associated with the sadness?""No, the sadness is under the thoughts. It’s like when you’re on a camping trip, and it’s really cold, and you put on extra socks, and an extra sweater, but you still can’t get warm, because the coldness is in your bones.""Do you hope to get away from it?""Not anymore. I just hope to come to peace with it." View Larger

humansofnewyork:

"I’m always sad."
"Are there certain thoughts associated with the sadness?"
"No, the sadness is under the thoughts. It’s like when you’re on a camping trip, and it’s really cold, and you put on extra socks, and an extra sweater, but you still can’t get warm, because the coldness is in your bones."
"Do you hope to get away from it?"
"Not anymore. I just hope to come to peace with it."


i’m amazed today in so many interviews that i’ve done, how few people say that they want the job. maybe people are shy, or think it’s presumptuous…to anyone who reads this piece: in an interview, i would recommend you say, “if i leave you with one thought, i really want this job. and if you pick me, i will want this job every day that i’m here and i will be really good at it.”

instyle's ariel foxman (via sarazucker)


For years mental health professionals taught people that they could be psychologically healthy without social support, that “unless you love yourself, no one else will love you.” Women were told that they didn’t need men, and vice versa. People without any relationships were believed to be as healthy as those who had many. These ideas contradict the fundamental biology of human species: we are social mammals and could never have survived without deeply interconnected and interdependent human contact. The truth is, you cannot love yourself unless you have been loved and are loved. The capacity to love cannot be built in isolation.

Bruce D. Perry, M.D., The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist’s Notebook (via psychotherapy)